BeeGAP grow bees

Help grow bees + get a discount 

If you are interested in learning how to grow “stingless” solitary bees for personal (your garden) and commercial food pollination (the grocery store’s garden), then please consider purchasing your solitary bee growing products at Crown Bees.

To receive up to a (30%) discount for all products for growing solitary bees on the Crown Bees website, enter the special discount code “psm-beegap” at Crown Bees shopping cart/checkout area.

PSM fully supports the BeeGAP method from Crown Bees (Washington state).  As created by Crown Bees’ CEO, Dave Hunter, the BeeGAP method debuted just prior to BeeSWeek 2013.  BeeSWeek 2013 was held in June, during the Albuquerque Film & Media Experience (AFME).

Click here to learn about BeeGAP and growing native solitary bees.

When you purchase products (equipment) from Crown Bees using the discount code “psm-beegap”, PSM receives an affiliate commission.  This “non-profit” qualified payment to PSM from Crown Bees funds super-important projects to save and restore bees and the food supply chain.

Click here to learn more about PSM’s Restorative Retail (RR) system.

CEO Dave Hunter of Crown Bees

CEO Dave Hunter of Crown Bees

Public Service Message

Click here to download this message in an audio file.

A pollinator is an insect that carries pollen from one flower to another.  Flowers are the seed-bearing part of a plant.  One of every three bites of food that we put into our mouths is grown in fields and orchards by plants that are pollinated by bees.  There are over 20,000 different types of bees.  And in fact, bees are the most effective insect pollinators of the human food supply of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and spices.

Pollinating bees are dying faster than they can repopulate. Reasons for such rapid losses of bees include:

  1. Parasites (Varroa mite, Nosema Cernae)
  2. Viruses (20+)
  3. Bacterial disease (American Foulbrood)
  4. Pesticides
  5. Nutrition and diet
  6. Genetics
  7. Queen quality
  8. Management
  9. Climate and change

Resource: http://www.pollinator.org/beeissues.htm

These issues have profoundly affected all bees, including the beloved honey bee. Since the 1990’s, the planet and humanity has failed to preserve at least one-third of the total number of bees that pollinate our food supply.

While there is not currently a way to save the failing honey bees, there IS a solution; our Nation’s only backyard gardening community action plan, called BeeGAP.  The BeeGAP method is free to learn, and makes your growing of gentle, solitary bees, easy.

Solitary bees do not sting, and live as individuals in tubes that are cut from natural reeds.  Farmers that produce foods that come from trees are in desperate need of solitary bees, or food will not be grown or available for sale.

Your growing of solitary bees requires just several hours of attention per year. While you are growing solitary bees, your garden and the gardens of your immediate neighbors will be beautified.

Once you have grown excess bees, BeeGAP will take them during their cocoon stage.  BeeGAP will deliver your solitary bee cocoons to local and regional orchards, where they will grow and pollinate our Nation’s organic food trees.  BeeGAP works with organic farms that will keep the bees safe and away from chemicals.

If you do not currently grow your own food, then it may be up to you to help keep your local and regional food farms in production.  As it has just happened with almonds, it is estimated that North American famine conditions will affect citizens within just four to ten years.  Famine is a widespread scarcity of food, caused by factors that include crop failure and government policies.

This time on our planet provides an excellent opportunity for each of us to increase personal understanding of the food system, and to build and join a global community that directly impacts health and quality of life.

All over the planet there are many wonderful people, working daily to change the trajectory and results of this genuinely serious challenge.  You are invited and encouraged to be part of your own livelihood by sharing and discussing this information, and supporting the cause by taking action for yourself.  Thank You for your awareness.

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One thought on “BeeGAP grow bees

  1. Pingback: What a grocery store without bees looks like | MNN – Mother Nature Network « Bioscience + Innovation

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